Australian surgeries mark first use of Titan Spine’s Endoskeleton interbody

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Titan Spine Endoskeleton range
The Endoskeleton range includes devices for a variety of procedures and approaches

In 2014, the company received clearance from the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) to market their range of interbody fusion devices. Two anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) procedures were undertaken at Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane, Australia.

Richard Laherty, spine surgeon at Queensland Neurosurgery and Spine Surgery at Princess Alexandra Hospital performed the procedures “successfully” in October, the company says.

“I was pleased to finally have the opportunity to use the Endoskeleton titanium devices,” says Laherty. “In the first few weeks following these initial cases, we have observed favourable patient outcomes in both cases, and I look forward to offering the Endoskeleton devices to more of my patients moving forward.”

Says Kevin Gemas, president of Titan Spine, “We anticipate tremendous growth in this new region to drive substantial growth for Titan in the coming quarters and beyond.”

The two surgeries mark the company’s venture into a “robust new market”, they say.

The Endoskeleton titanium implants feature Titan’s proprietary surface technology, “consisting of a unique combination of roughened topographies at the macro, micro, and cellular levels.”

The company says that the surface topography is designed to create an “optimal host–bone response” and to promote the “upregulation of osteogenic and angiogenic factors necessary for bone growth”. Research into the implants’ encouragement of the production of bone morphogenic proteins has been published in both Spine and The Spine Journal.

All Endoskeleton devices are subject to the company’s warranty, which was announced in 2014 and expanded in 2016.

Titan Spine is based in both Mequon, USA, and in Laichingen, Germany.

 

Correction, 09.21am 22 Nov 2017. A previous version of this article included an image of the Endoskeleton TL, which was not used in the Australian procedures.

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